Novelty: Adopting New Ideas

Takes time to get believers. From Seth Godin’s new book sales numbers.

Inspiration:

http://www.jordanstrength.com/focusing-on-the-science-in-sport-science/

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2015/01/most-people-wait-for-most-people.html

http://news-beta.nationalgeographic.com/2015/01/150114-climbing-yosemite-caldwell-jorgeson-capitan/

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There are many new ideas out there.

And, there are also many people out there to present a single topic or idea, which gives many variations and possible ways to express that idea.

The combination is astronomical; leading to overwhelming possibilities.

But, if it was already someone else’s idea, how can it be novel?

It is novel because its the first time you have experienced it, and therefore it is new.

New is scary.

Our brain is designed to be skeptical of new. To move cautiously towards it – often delaying us to really experiencing this “new” idea.

Those close to us warn us, and even sometimes, tell us not to do it.

Don’t get mad at them as they’re just trying to keep us from self inflicting serious pain; the pain from not achieving your dreams.

Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson just completed a first. Read HERE about it.

Its true that we shouldn’t be quick to jump ship. To take the plunge. To be first in line.

But, we also shouldn’t wait forever to do something.

New then Old – Performance Clock?

I struggle with this every day. I read this new research article or blog post from a great coach and I want to immediately do it. We must always be learning and growing, which means we DO need to adopt new ideas (or else get left in the dust!).

This can also be a diagram for a successful team. The athletes on the team that are early adopts will jump on your bandwagon sooner than the late majority. I think it’s important to recognize your early adopters and get them to be successful quickly! In time, with good results, most athletes will buy into what you’re doing. As for the laggards, well, they will either respectfully quit because they recognize they are outnumbered or you need to confront them about what’s going on.

I think when you take over a new program you will see bigger numbers of people leaving the team not in the first year but in year 2 or 3. I think this is because these athletes feel like either they can outwit you and your vision/mission, or, they don’t get the results they want and decide to move on. It hurts to have someone say that what you’re doing isn’t working, however, it can be a compliment.

That is, your maintaining your values and pushing the limits of what is possible for the rate of change that people can handle. Remember, the brain is slow to adopt “newness” because it can be lethal to constantly be out of homeostasis!

You could also suck as a person/coach/etc and that is why people are leaving. Sometimes it’s hard to tell.

At the World Athletics Center I heard that you do mostly what you know to be true, play with some things that you think you know, and guess on a tiny bit – well, then you may have all your bases covered.

And, hey, in doing so, you may come across something “new”!

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